Duplicate GPS Devices Produce an Accidental Art

January 30th, 2014

What an epic view as two GPS devices simultaneously pumping data back to data server and the track displayed back on the map. These locations data will be displayed as a zig-zagging track. Any comments, what you guys called this situation?

Raspberry Pi As a Cheap Home Surveillance System

January 19th, 2014

CCTV

Home surveillance systems are incredibly expensive, but if you’re looking for more of a DIY approach, Instructables user Scavix shows off how to build your own small-scale system for about $120 using a Raspberry Pi.

Scavix’s system uses a Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi camera module, some housing for that camera, and a few other smaller pieces. After some set up, the end result is a home security system that can detect motion, broadcast a live stream, and more. It’s a surprisingly powerful system all things considered and it’s cheap enough that you can set up a few of them if you like.

Source: Instructables

$20 GPS/GLONASS/Beidou Receiver

January 19th, 2014

GPS Module

Sticking a GPS module in a project has been a common occurrence for a while now, whether it be for a reverse geocache or for a drone telemetry system. These GPS modules are expensive, though, and they only listen in on GPS satellites – not the Russian GLONASS satellites or the Chinese Beidou satellites. NavSpark has the capability to listen to all these positioning systems, all while being an Arduino-compatible board that costs about $20.

Inside the NavSpark is a 32-bit microcontroller core (no, not ARM. LEON) with 1 MB of Flash 212kB of RAM, and a whole lot of horsepower. Tacked onto this core is a GPS unit that’s capable of listening in on GPS, GPS and GLONASS, or GPS and Beidou signals.

On paper, it’s an extremely impressive board for any application that needs any sort of global positioning and a powerful microcontroller. There’s also the option of using two of these boards and active antennas to capture carrier phase information, bringing the accuracy of this setup down to a few centimeters. Very cool, indeed.

Source: Hack A Day

A Whole-House Lighting System That Creates Its Own Energy

August 4th, 2013

verve lighting switchWell, enegry is free. And, can be found anywhere. That’s what I’m aware of. Do you? 🙂

The energy harvested from physically moving the switches on Verve’s control panel is enough to transmit a radio signal as far as 300 feet to a central controller, which then relays the power to the individual hardwired lights or outlets. Enocean first developed the switches, that generate their own power via electro-dynamic generators linked to the movement of the light switches themselves.

The switch itself does not offer a status “on” or “off” light like some of the more expensive systems, but the central controller hubs, which are programmable, can give you a whole-house status report. The user can setup an unlimited number of scenes in minutes–each controller is networked to the other for total house lighting control from a single switch.

But the killer thing? You can tack the switch to almost any surface and move it without the need to pull wires and rip up your walls. The switch is basically just a remote control that lives anywhere you want it (within range of the controller that is). It is not silent but rather makes a solid click sound so you get feedback even if you don’t have status lights on the switch itself.

It’s an old concept, but it worth to be implemented.

Source: Green Dream

Links: Enocean, Verve Living System

Israeli Drone Pilots Made Their Life-and-Death Choices Over Gaza, and how?

November 24th, 2012

A Heron drone at the Palmahim air base in Israel in December of 2011. Photo: AP/Dan Balilty

The latest round of fighting between Israel and Hamas has settled into an uneasy ceasefire. But that won’t stop Israel’s drones from filling the skies over Gaza. In this 2009 story, written during the final days of the last Israel-Hamas  conflict, we took a look at how one drone pilot grappled with the moral choices that came with remotely spying, and ordering death, from above.

Life or Death choices will never been easier with judgement done through small screen. how these guys, manage doing these task properly or most importantly humanly. Guess, wired have this story covered here. Come on, take a look.

Courtesy: Wired.com

 

Info: History of Light

November 23rd, 2012

Guys, herewith some brief information about history of light prepared by some friends at Q-Ray LED Lighting. As technologies evolves the light become more green (i mean, not the light is green in color. It’s more likely going with less and less carbon foot prints).
brief history of lights by QRay LED Lighting

Courtesy of Q-Ray LED Lighting

International Greentech & Eco Products Exhibition & Conference Malaysia 2012

October 12th, 2012

It has been a while (quite long actually),  I haven’t post anything here. I’ve stumbled upon this video on Youtube which is apparently gave me some ideas to continue posting some articles around Green Technologies.

International Greentech & Eco Products Exhibition & Conference Malaysia — at KL Convention Center (KLCC).

So, some quick researches lead me to 3rd International Greentech & Eco Products Exhibition & Conference Malaysia — currently being held at KL Convention Center (KLCC). Without any further thoughts, I will be there today to do some researches.

So, stay tune buddy. I’ll post some stuff as soon as tonight. Well, tonight is Friday night, maybe tomorrow. 🙂

Enjoy this video & happy TGIF:

Links:

GPS Units Disable Themselves If They Go Faster Than 1,200 MPH

August 13th, 2011

This is somehow a legacy border, but anyone out there have busted this fact? – GPS units disable themselves if they go faster than 1,200 mph and if they go above 60,000 feet…

GPS module

In GPS technology, the phrasing “COCOM Limits” is also used to refer to a limit placed to GPS tracking devices that should disable tracking when the device realizes itself to be moving faster than 1,000 knots (1,900 km/h; 1,200 mph) at an altitude higher than 60,000 feet (18,000 m).This was intended to avoid the use of GPS in intercontinental ballistic missile-like applications.

Some manufacturers apply this limit literally (disable when both limits are reached), other manufacturers disable tracking when a single limit is reached.

This limit is a frequent obstacle encountered, if not discussed, among hobbyists seeking to make high altitude balloons and of course would be a problem for homemade space programs.

courtesy: wikipedia

Hacking Home Automation Systems Through Power Lines

August 13th, 2011



 

X10-Jammer.png

Quoted from Hackaday.com

As home automation becomes more and more popular, hackers and security experts alike are turning their attention to these systems, to see just how (in)secure they are.

This week at DefCon, a pair of researchers demonstrated just how vulnerable home automation systems can be. Carrying out their research independently, [Kennedy] and [Rob Simon] came to the same conclusion – that manufacturers of this immature technology have barely spent any time or resources properly securing their wares.

The researchers built tools that focus on the X10 line of home automation products, but they also looked at ZWave, another commonly used protocol for home automation communications. They found that ZWare-based devices encrypted their conversations, but that the initial key exchange was done in the open, allowing any interested 3rd party to intercept the keys and decrypt the communications.

While you might initially assume that attacks are limited to the power lines within a single house, [Kennedy] says that the signals leak well beyond the confines of your home, and that he was able to intercept communications from 15 distinct systems in his neighborhood without leaving his house.

Can’t imagine how someone disturbing your private time while you’re enjoying your hot bath? think again. have a nice weekend.

Courtesy: Hackaday, Wired

How GPS Bends Time

July 16th, 2011

Equation section, WIRED magazine:

GPS-time.png

Einstein knew what he was talking about with that relativity stuff. For proof, just look at your GPS. The global positioning system relies on 24 satellites that transmit time-stamped information on where they are. Your GPS unit registers the exact time at which it receives that information from each satellite and then calculates how long it took for the individual signals to arrive. By multiplying the elapsed time by the speed of light, it can figure out how far it is from each satellite, compare those distances, and calculate its own position.

For accuracy to within a few meters, the satellites’ atomic clocks have to be extremely precise—plus or minus 10 nanoseconds. Here’s where things get weird: Those amazingly accurate clocks never seem to run quite right. One second as measured on the satellite never matches a second as measured on Earth—just as Einstein predicted.

According to Einstein’s special theory of relativity, a clock that’s traveling fast will appear to run slowly from the perspective of someone standing still. Satellites move at about 9,000 mph—enough to make their onboard clocks slow down by 8 microseconds per day from the perspective of a GPS gadget and totally screw up the location data. To counter this effect, the GPS system adjusts the time it gets from the satellites by using the equation here. (Don’t even get us started on the impact of general relativity.)

 

courtesy: wired.com