Posts Tagged ‘home wireless network’

Wirelessly Automate Your Home

Sunday, November 14th, 2010

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I’ve stumbled across this quite simple idea of home automation using Wifi. [Mrx23] combined OpenWRT, a microcontroller, and a set of RF controlled outlet switches to add automation to his plug-in devices. An RF remote that controls the switched outlets has been connected to an Arduino. The router communicates with the Arduino via a serial connection. And the router is controlled by a web interface which means you can use a smartphone or other web device to control the outlets.

The best thing about this system is the power that the router wields. Since it has an underlying Linux kernel you have the option of setting CRON jobs to turn lighting on and off, and group settings can be established to set up a room’s lighting level for watching movies, hosting guests, etc. Combine this with the fact that OpenWRT can use port forwarding for Internet control and the possibilities really start to open up.

Courtesy Mrx23 at Instructables.com

Wireless explanations

Friday, October 29th, 2010

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Consumers today can choose from WHDI, wireless HD, WiDi, wireless USB and Wi-Fi Direct. Confused? Check out our guide to these emerging wireless streaming-media technologies.

WHDI

Wireless Home Digital Interface, or WHDI, was finalized in 2009 to give consumers a way to link the PC to the TV. Think of it as the wireless equivalent of HDMI. The technology has a latency of less than 1 millisecond, which means it’s good enough not just for watching movies but should also work well to stream games from your browser to the TV.

WHDI can stream 1080p video at up to 3 Gbps (gigabits per second). All you need is a wireless HDI dongle that can plug into your laptop and a little receiver that goes behind the TV. That set will cost about RM464.48 and will be available early next year.

Meanwhile, TV makers such as Sharp and LG are rolling out TVs with built-in support for WHDI standard.

Slowly, the WHDI consortium hopes to convince PC makers integrate WHDI chips into laptops, similar to the way Wi-Fi chips are built in today.

WirelessHD

While other wireless technologies focus on streaming content from the PC to the TV, WirelessHD targets the most common electronic eyesore in homes: the black HDMI cables that snake out from behind the TV towards the set-top box, PC or the DVD player.

If built into TV sets, WirelessHD can offer fast data transfers of up to 10 GBps to 28 Gbps. That makes it the fastest of the lot for point-to-point data transfer.

So far, TV makers such as Panasonic, LG and Vizio have said they will offer wireless-HD–enabled sets by the end of the year. (more…)

HomePlug earns baseline IEEE approval

Saturday, December 27th, 2008

HomePlug has an alliance with Zigbee to develop a common application layer so the two protocols can communicate…

The HomePlug Powerline Alliance today announced that its technology proposal was accepted by the IEEE P1901 Working Group as the baseline for an IEEE powerline communications standard. The voting took place last week in Kyoto, Japan, where other proposals for Access and Coexistence standards for powerline technology also were approved.

“That’s exciting for us,” said Rob Ranck, president of the HomePlug Powerline Alliance. “It’s important for us to have specs inside the alliance, but we think it is important to have greater spread and scope, and IEEE brings that.”

An IEEE standard will enable HomePlug Powerline technology to be more rapidly and widely deployed to more consumers, Ranck said. The Coexistence standard was also significant. “It shows the IEEE understands there are multiple powerline technologies and having a platform for coexistence is important, because right now there are conflicting standards.

Source: TelephonyOnline