Posts Tagged ‘radio technologies’

Open source satellites

Thursday, May 6th, 2010

machineSat.jpg

After three years of research and one year of experience as a satellite engineer, Song Hojun has found that it is possible to launch and operate a personal satellite at a fairly reasonable price. In addition, he has for the past five years been exploring ways to integrate the concept of a personal satellite project into cultural contexts and into his artistic practice.

mpSatEvent.jpg
All the satellite-related systems (except for the rocket to launch it) are DIY programs — designed so that regular people may also have the chance of developing and eventually launching their own.

Song have presented this system and how it works at the Machine Project, Los Angeles on 2010, 25th April.

For the people who want to study or getting a clearer picture of the involving mechanisme, they can download Song’s book from Google Books here.

Courtesy: Open Source Satellite Initiative via Make

How to build your own RFID reader

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

DIY RFID

Do you have any idea on how easy it is to build your own RFID reader? Well, we stumbled upon some sites that’ll give you some clearer picture on how to make this thing happens. As pointed out by hackaday,

[Klulukasz] left a comment pointing to this DIY RFID reader that was a final project in 2006 for a class at Cornell University. It is well documented and includes not only a schematic and code, but an explanation of the design considerations used during the build. The project uses an ATmega32 and the parts list priced out at about $50 at the time. There were plenty of responses to theRFID spoofer post pointing out that there are readers available for $40, but we want the fun of building our own.

A bit more vague with the details but no less interesting is this other simple RFID reader design.

Courtesy: hackaday

Radio monitoring book re-released under a Creative Commons license

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

skips-book.jpg

Make contributor T.J. “Skip” Arey says:

Many of you know that, some time back, I authored a book called Radio Monitoring — A How To Guide. Originally published by Index Publishing Group and later released by Paladin Press, is had two very successful editions that sold for many years. This book has recently gone out of print but I am pleased to say that I have now released it on line (for FREE) via Creative Commons license. I admit that a few points are a bit dated but the book still has a lot to offer the beginner or even experienced radio hobbyist. You can download a copy thanks to the North American Shortwave Association (NASWA) who have consented to be the primary online source for distribution. The hobby has been good to me over the years. I am happy to give this book back to the radio community. Enjoy.

Courtesy: Naswa.net via Make

RFID tracking system

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

This is a working tracking system using RFID tags built by Nicholas Skinner. The system’s tags operate in the 2.4 GHz band and are used to track either people or assets. The readers are on a mesh network and can triangulate the location of any tag for display on a map. His system is even set up to show the travel history of each tag. [Nicholas] shared every detail in his writeup including some background about available hardware options and how he made his final decisions on what devices to use for the job. His conglomeration of software that ties the whole project together is also available for download.

http://hackadaycom.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/rfid-tracking-system.jpg?w=470&h=344

courtesy: ns-tech

Lazy man’s USB RFID reader

Sunday, August 2nd, 2009

usbrfid5-custom.jpg

[Don] had some Serial RFID readers that he needed to work and be powered by USB. He went out and purchased a simple serial to USB converter, but was left with the problem of the operating voltage. He supplies the schematics on his site for his solution. Basically he gutted the converter and integrated it all with the appropriate voltage broken out. The final project is nice, using the serial to USB convert as the project box and even including a nice LED to show when an RFID tag has been read.

source: Hack a Day

XBee PRO is pretty cool

Sunday, August 10th, 2008

http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:OCV8gZJKGTLO3M:http://www.recherche.enac.fr/wiki_images/XBee_pro.jpgThis is an interesting blog post, mostly because the XBee Pro is rated at about 1.6 km line of sight. However this guy is claiming to get about 150m (~150 yards) before data gets corrupted….

So i have a side project that i’m working on, a wireless OBD-II scanner.  It’s pretty interesting and I have some guidence from a professor at WPI.  The wireless unit I chose to work with is the XBee PRO.  This thing is solid.  The development kit ($179) came with everything I needed to get started and get proof of concept.  I was transmitting wireless data within minutes of setting up the system.  The chip is extremely small, too, so it has a variety of applications.

Source: Zigbee News by Freaklabs

Wibree vs Zigbee

Saturday, May 24th, 2008

Some overview of Wibree vs Zigbee features:

  • Wibree is a PAN (Personal Area Networking) technology
  • Zigbee is a mesh networking technology
  • Wibree is more power efficient
  • Zigbee has got more range
  • Wibree’s data transfer rate is 1 Mbps
  • Zigbees Data transfer rate is 250 Kbps
  • Wibree has got a star topology
  • Zigbee has got a mesh topology
  • Wibree uses bluetooth radio and can co-exist with bluetooth
  • Zigbee needs its own special radio and has got no relationship with bluetooth