Posts Tagged ‘rfid reader’

How to build your own RFID reader

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

DIY RFID

Do you have any idea on how easy it is to build your own RFID reader? Well, we stumbled upon some sites that’ll give you some clearer picture on how to make this thing happens. As pointed out by hackaday,

[Klulukasz] left a comment pointing to this DIY RFID reader that was a final project in 2006 for a class at Cornell University. It is well documented and includes not only a schematic and code, but an explanation of the design considerations used during the build. The project uses an ATmega32 and the parts list priced out at about $50 at the time. There were plenty of responses to theRFID spoofer post pointing out that there are readers available for $40, but we want the fun of building our own.

A bit more vague with the details but no less interesting is this other simple RFID reader design.

Courtesy: hackaday

iPhone RFID Reader

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

rfid-reader-for-iphone.jpg

The idea behind this project is to see what the iPhone’s serial is capable of and to try and have a little fun with RFID along the way. This reader works with the low frequency (125Khz) tags but I have a half working version for MiFARE Hi-Frequency as well.

For this project you will need:

  1. An iPhone USB Cable (genuine one is best and probably at least 3!)
  2. A JAILBROKEN iPhone!
  3. An ID-12 RFID Reader
  4. An ID-12 Breakout Board
  5. Logic Level Converter
  6. It’s useful to have some IC Sockets for Soldering
  7. Glass Tags if you want extra fun or any
    125Khz Tags
  8. If you don’t like the idea of taking iPhone Cables apart, use an iPhone Breakout Board
  9. A Battery Pack with a 5V step up
  10. Wire.
  11. Some kind of switch.
  12. A box to put it all in.
Wow, is it really enough to finish the job? All we need is some determinations and courages – well, i think so! Check out this video!

Courtesy: Section9

RFID emulator

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

rfid-emulator.jpg

[Alexander] built an RFID emulator. It uses a wire coil (not pictured here) and an ATmega8 to represent any tag that is EM4001 compliant. This iteration requires connection to a computer to send the tag ID information to the microcontroller. In the video after the break it looks like he’s using a DIY RFID reader to test this. If the two were combined, cutting out the need for a computer, he would have an RFID spoofer on his hands.

source: hackaday