Posts Tagged ‘telehealth’

These Tiny Magnetometers Detect Fields Generated by Human Heart!

Sunday, October 24th, 2010

3o7tuekr.jpg

How can i imagine this tiny and ‘poor’ little thing can help a human life? hmm… I’m still thinking.

At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) scientists have been working on microfabricated atomic magnetometers capable of detecting faint magnetic fields. The devices, about 1cm3 in size, were taken to the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Berlin, Germany where supposedly resides the most magnetically isolated building in the world. Using the tiny magnetometers, investigators were able to detect the magnetic signature of human heartbeats, perhaps opening up the possibility for a new modality to complement ECG.

Courtesy of MedGadget.com

AT&Ts Telehealth Wirelessly Monitors Patient Health

Sunday, January 18th, 2009




Doctors’ offices may soon become much less crowded. AT&T is developing a software tool and networking platform that will use wireless devices to record a patient’s health measurements at home and send the data to the doctor. AT&T’s system runs on both Wi-Fi — enabling videoconferencing — and a second wireless technology named ZigBee, which receives data from medical sensors. ZigBee consumes considerably less power than Wi-Fi, so monitoring devices, including thermometers, pill dispensers, blood-pressure monitors, and pulse oximeters, can use small batteries to transmit data over long periods of time.

Home-based monitoring services like AT&T’s — which is approaching the trial stage — could transform how doctors interact with their patients. “The health-care industry is under a lot of stress,” says Bob Miller, executive director of AT&T’s communications-technology research department, “so there’s a drive to explore ways of delivering better care at lower cost.” And greater convenience for both doctor and patient: If a physician notices, for instance, that a blood-pressure medication isn’t working, or if the patient isn’t taking the drugs regularly, she’ll be able to arrange a videoconference with the patient to discuss solutions.

Source: Fast Company