Posts Tagged ‘zigbee technologies’

What Every RF Engineer Should Know: ZigBee

Saturday, January 10th, 2009

Looks like Zigbee still has some time before taking off… “From a revenue standpoint, the volume of metering applications should remain limited to field trials in 2009 with a larger production ramp in 2010”

ZigBee is a hot topic on the RF DesignLine, so I had a virtual “sit down” with some leaders in the industry to see where the technology is, and where they think it is going. The following article includes some of the thoughts and remarks of Emmanuel Sambuis, marketing manager for TI’s Low Power RF products; Jeff Miller, Product Manager, Tanner EDA; and Ravi Sharma, Director of Marketing for Ember.

After the interview, I’ve included some links to some of the most popular ZigBee articles on the site.

RFDL: What is the status of the technology? Sharma: ZigBee has matured into a robust and reliable standard and has become the wireless technology of choice for the utilities in implementing smart metering for demand response and energy management as well as in home automation, monitoring and security. ZigBee shipments in the past two years have been in the millions, in applications including in-home displays, light, climate and media controls, smart meters and home security to name a few. The ZigBee Alliance now boasts a membership in excess of 300 companies from around the world.

Source: RFDesignline

DataNet Wireless Data Acquisition System

Friday, December 26th, 2008




The DataNet is a professional wireless data acquisition system using the Zigbee wireless protocol. Consisting of a USB base station, DataNet acquisition units, repeater units and the DataNet PC Suite logging software. The acquisition units have 4 inputs for direct measurement of PT-100, thermocouple, voltage 4-20mA, frequency and pulse. There is also a version with the addition of built-in temperature and humidity sensors.

Source: Audon Electronics

Cold Chain Fleet Management Made Easy with ColdTrak

Saturday, November 15th, 2008

ColdTrak, the leading Cold Chain vehicle tracking system from market leading GPS tracking specialists CMS SupaTrak is helping UK businesses save money on cold chain running costs thanks to the tracking applications

The cold chain monitoring solution enables fleet managers to get more control of their cold chain fleets by tracking the exact location of their vehicles whilst allowing their drivers to monitor the precise temperatures of refrigerated cargo saving them considerable costs.

In accordance to EU regulation EN 12830:1999 all cold chain businesses must now supervise the exact temperature of chilled or refrigerated goods whilst in transit ColdTrak has proven to be an indispensable business asset.

ColdTrak works using the very latest ZigBee technology and uses robust sensors that send precise temperature recordings from the refrigerated trailer to a central information hub or system in the cab with the driver. Should there be any changes in temperature the driver will be notified and the correct action can be taken.

Source: Open Press

Sniffing ZigBee Packets

Saturday, September 6th, 2008




When engineers tackle a project that uses ZigBee communications they may get a surprise. Unlike point-to-point communications, ZigBee involves a network that can establish nodes, repeaters and complex mesh topologies. The proper test tools–often called “sniffers”–help engineers diagnose ZigBee-network problems that could otherwise turn into nightmares.

Microchip Technology includes the ZENA Wireless Network Analyzer with its PICDEM Z demonstration kit so engineers can see what goes on among ZigBee devices. The ZENA tool also can sniff and decode Microchip’s MiWi protocol that, like ZigBee, uses IEEE 802.15.4 radios. According to Steve Bible, an applications engineering manager at Microchip, ZENA time stamps packets and displays them in a graphical format. ”

The screen shows the destination and source addresses, the payload and the data,” explained Bible. “We add some color coding and provide data as hexadecimal values. Users also see a received signal strength indication, or RSSI–an uncalibrated relative value.”

“ZigBee and IEEE 802.15.4 technologies require a shift in how we analyze and manage ad-hoc wireless networks,” said Matt Perkins, VP of technology development at Awarepoint, a supplier of wireless asset-tracking systems. “An analyzer should take time-sliced snapshots of network traffic, ‘mine’ the traffic for metrics such as throughput, bottlenecks and end-to-end delays, and presents information in a concise graphical form.”

Source: Freaklabs

ZigBee modules mesh for Russian metering

Sunday, August 31st, 2008




Telegesis UK has won a major order to supply its advanced Zigbee module products to TBN Energoservice of Russia TBN Energoservice specialises in the development of automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) systems using the latest technical developments.

TBN is implementing a major wireless water AMR system based on ZigBee radio technology.The system uses ZigBee mesh networking software and silicon delivered in module form via the ETRX2 module produced by Telegesis.In Russia, domestic water has traditionally been preheated in dedicated power plants and pumped directly to consumer’s apartments.

TBN is implementing a major wireless water AMR system based on ZigBee radio technology. The system uses ZigBee mesh networking software and silicon delivered in module form via the ETRX2 module produced by Telegesis. In Russia, domestic water has traditionally been preheated in dedicated power plants and pumped directly to consumer’s apartments. Read more on this article…

Open Source Zigbee Stack

Sunday, August 24th, 2008

http://images.nakedmaya.com/logo_zigbee.gif Many RF technologies are competing on 2.4GHz. The WLAN and Bluetooth have dominated the consumer wireless market. Zigbee is getting hotter in the mesh network application as well. More and more chip vendors have released their new products for Zigbee. TI/Chipcon, Freescale, Microchip, Atmel, Slilabs and Amber are active in Zigbee market. Zigbee is a wireless mesh network; its initial investment is much higher than an individual microcontroller based application. A serious development on a Zigbee project must include ICs, the Zigbee stack, the application software in the network nodes and the network administration software for the control terminals.

In September 2007, TI announced that it opened its fully functional Zigbee stack, Z-stack to the developers. Every registered developer can download the source code from the web site for free of charge. It was a shock to this market. Before this open source promotion, the quotation of this certificated Z-Stack source code was 100K USD.

Z-Stack can be downloaded in two formats: a “core” stack installer or a “full” stack installer. The “core” installer is targeted to experienced Z-Stack users who only need updated library and source files. The “full” installer is intended for users who would like additional application examples.

Source: emcelettronica

Home networking with Zigbee

Sunday, July 27th, 2008

For the last few years, we’ve witnessed a great expansion of remote control devices in our day-to-day life. Five years ago, infrared (IR) remotes for the television were the only such devices in our homes. Now I quickly run out of fingers as I count the devices and appliances I can control remotely in my house. This number will only increase as more devices are controlled or monitored from a distance.

To interact with all these remotely controlled devices, we’ll need to put them under a single standardized control interface that can interconnect into a network, specifically a HAN or home-area network. One of the most promising HAN protocols is ZigBee, a software layer based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. This article will introduce you to ZigBee—how it works and how it may be more appropriate than simply accumulating more remotes.

Why so many remotes? Right now, the more remotely controlled devices we install in our homes, the more remotes we accumulate. Devices such as TVs, garage door openers, and light and fan controls predominantly support one-way, point-to-point control. They’re not interchangeable and they don’t support more than one device. Because most remotely controlled devices are proprietary and not standardized among manufacturers, even those remotes used for the same function (like turning on and off lights) are not interchangeable with similar remotes from different manufacturers. In other words, you’ll have as many separate remote control units as you have devices to control.

Some modern IR remotes enable you to control multiple devices by “learning” transmitting codes. But because the range for IR control is limited by line of sight, they’re used predominantly for home entertainment control.

A HAN can solve both problems because it doesn’t need line-of-sight communication and because a single remote (or other type of control unit) can command many devices.

Source: Embedded.com

Radiocrafts Rolls Out Compact ZigBee Network Module

Sunday, July 6th, 2008

Radiocrafts AS, a leading provider of compact RF modules, now expand their product line with a compact ZigBee Network Module (ZNM) for use in ZigBee based mesh networks. The ZNM module offers the complete ZigBee network protocol in a small module with an easy to use API interface. By using the new ZNM module, ZigBee applications can be built with minimum effort, reducing time to market.

The RC2300-ZNM module is a compact surface-mounted high performance module measuring only 12.7 x 25.4 x 2.5 mm including EMC shielding and integrated antenna. The module is delivered on tape and reel for volume production.

The module is very easy to use having a UART or SPI interface for serial communication and configuration. The ZigBee application runs in any external controller, communicating with the module by an easy-to-use API. With only 10 API calls, a complete application can be made. The new module supports all features of the ZigBee 2006 standard.

The RC2300-ZNM module is pre-certified for operation under the European, FCC and ARIB radio regulations for license-free use. It operates at 16 channels in the 2.45 GHz frequency band. When used with quarter-wave antennas a line-of-sight range of 250 meter can be achieved. Indoor range is typically 10 – 30 meter. The module is designed for use in battery operated systems using sleep mode with less than 1 uA.

Source: EDA Geek